Retiring? Relocate To Florida or Alaska To Avoid Additional Taxes

Senior couple at table calculating domestic bills. Horizontal shot.

Retirement is usually the time for relaxation, leaving worries behind and doing all of the things you want to do. Unfortunately, your income is considerably less than that of when you were working full time, so you will be existing on a fixed income. So every retiree is trying to pay the IRS as little as they possibly can. Some assess their tax returns with a microscope and look for every deduction they can legally claim. Others simply choose to relocate somewhere else. But you can just relocate to another state and not a foreign country. There are no income taxes in 9 states. And if they really want to leave IRS issues behind and avoid additional taxes, there are no sales taxes in five states.

Among the states that fit into both of these criteria is Alaska. Alaska is the ideal state to relocate to considering these 2 requirements. Of course, a substantial adjustment for numerous people is the weather. The 49th state might seem like the ideal state to retire in if you can get over the weather. In reality, this could possibly cause an IRS issue as Alaska is not as tax-free as it seems to be at first glance.

A few of Alaska’s boroughs collect property taxes, though the state does not charge sales tax. Only your first $150,000 will be exempted if you are at least 65 years old. Moreover, if you’re concerned about the inheritance that you’ll be leaving your children, you should be aware that Alaska also has an estate tax.

Obviously, it is not recommended to choose a place to retire based on taxes. But because you will be existing on a fixed income, it’s normal to be concerned about income and real estate taxes. You need to know that you’ll be paying more money for your home while you’re receiving less because when your income decreases, real estate taxes tend to increase. Also, to prevent IRS issues, you might wish to find out how your property taxes will increase if you renovate your home.

Of course, many people decide that they would rather not worry about the upkeep and maintenance of a big house and instead, choose to live in a small apartment. Though this means that property taxes are cancelled, they may end up having to pay income tax rates that are higher if they’re receiving considerable income from other sources like pensions. This is mainly decided by where your money comes from and not where you choose to live, regardless if it’s Alaska or Florida.

Income tax are not charged in states such as Texas, Washington, South Dakota, Nevada, Wyoming, Florida, Tennessee, Alaska, and New Hampshire. However, income made from stocks or bonds are charged with taxes in states such as New Hampshire and Tennessee. Once people leave their jobs to retire, these are two of their most common income sources.

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